Clients & Partners

Committed to Fishermen and Community

Catch Invest understands the challenges facing fishermen and fishing communities. Government regulations are tough to follow. Quotas can be difficult to buy or lease. And maintaining working waterfronts is always a hurdle for commercial fishing.   


We provide an array of services that support fishermen and communities to acquire quota and other fishing assets that will fuel their growth and profitability.

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Community Partners

We work with fishing communities to help fishermen make more money catching more abundant fish. Our core strategy is aimed at strengthening permit banks that protect fishing communities and small-scale, independent fishermen. Permit banks enable communities to own fishing quotas, lease them to fishermen at affordable rates, and increase access to the resource.  


Marthas Vineyard, MA

Martha’s Vineyard Fishermen’s Preservation Trust

In 2013, The Martha's Vineyard Fishermen’s Preservation Trust was formed to protect and restore the island’s historic fishing community. In 2017, the Trust purchased 20,000 pounds of scallop quota for $950,000—its first quota deal. The Trust is also buying conch and seabass permits, which it will use to support young fishermen. In summer 2017, the Trust will offer fresh dayboat scallops to the public through a newly launched “deck to dock” program.

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Kodiak, AK

Community Quota Entities

The native Alutiq communities on Kodiak Island in Alaska have a rich 7,000-year heritage of fishing to support village life. Their newly launching permit banks enable them to restore lost fishing access. With some 20,000 pounds of halibut quota worth approximately $1 million, the villages have begun to revitalize the local fishing economy, drawing in new young fishermen, supporting their families, and preserving native traditions and culture.

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Gulf of Mexico, TX, LA, FL

Gulf of Mexico Reef Shareholders’ Alliance

The Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholders Alliance launched the region’s first permit bank in 2015. The Alliance leases red snapper quota to grouper fishermen to improve accountability and reduce bycatch. In 2016, the permit bank leased 55,000 pounds to support 20. Moving forward, the Alliance plans to buy more quota and support new entrants.

 

Portland, Maine

Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association

The Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association, The Nature Conservancy, and the Island Institute have partnered to protect access for Maine’s community-based groundfish fleet through cooperative permit banking in Maine. Over the past six years, close to 750,000 lbs of allocation has been leased to fishermen within the Maine Coast Community Sector in support of research initiatives, small business development, and sustainable fishing. In 2016 alone, Maine fishermen saved over $122,000 and participated in 53 research trips supporting electronic monitoring, gear development, and stock assessment research.

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Sitka, AK

Alaska Sustainable Fisheries Trust/Local Loan Fund

The Alaska Sustainable Fisheries Trust (ASFT) has launched a loan fund functioning much like a permit bank. By matching quota sellers to local fishermen and using innovative approaches to finance fishermen to acquire quota, the loan fund supports local fishermen and communities. To date, the fund has facilitated the transfer of $500,000 in halibut and black cod fishing quota to local fishermen.

Cape Cod, MA

Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance/Cape Cod Fisheries Trust

The Cape Cod Fisheries Trust is a non-profit program that was launched in 2007 by investing $4 million in scallop, groundfish, and clam quotas. In an average year, the quotas are leased at affordable rates to 30 fishing vessels that employ 100 captains and crew. Each year, local fishermen save $500,000 on their leasing costs and catch an extra $3 million in seafood. The Trust is an important economic development engine on Cape Cod that provides local fishermen with the support and knowledge they need to build profitable fishing businesses.